The Good Nurse …but Good Person?

I’ll be the first to admit I love working with a good nurse.  Give me a good nurse any day! and we can work short-staffed, under pressure and come out smelling like roses with cheerful and sunny attitudes.  Alternatively, give me a fully-staffed shift of slackers and complainers, and we come out overworked, underpaid, grouchy, tired and beaten.  Yes, a good nurse is worth their weight in gold.

The good nurse can handle his/her patient care assignment with minimal or no unnecessary emotional drama.  I enjoy both the novice and the expert nurse when their work is efficient, comprehensive and professional.  And, thankfully, most nurses are sincerely good.

That said, though, I have noticed an ever-so-subtle difference between a “good nurse” and a “good person.”  Here’s what I mean:

Good N:  Manages her time well.
Good P:  Makes time to help you too.

Good N:  Succinctly provides need-to-know patient information to all parties.
Good P:  Succinctly provides humorous and pleasant conversation to everyone.

Good N:  Has a warm and gentle touch when providing care to his patients.
Good P:  Has a warm and gentle touch when interacting with anyone.

Good N:  Advocates for her patients directly and professionally with the appropriate authoritative body.
Good P:  Advocates for everyone with the same professionalism, regardless if they’re new or been around for a while.

Good N:  Provides the hard truth when pressed.
Good P:  Provides the hard truth always.

Good N:  Takes care of business, so to speak, with patients, visitors, and family.
Good P:  Takes care of business, so to speak, with self, colleagues, friends, own family, management, students, doctors, instructors as well as patients, visitors, and family.

Good N:  Stands up and speaks out when a situation impacts his ability to provide safe quality care.
Good P:  Stands up and speaks out when a situation impacts any nurse’s ability to provide safe quality care.

Good N:  Speaks out when treated unjustly on the unit.
Good P:  Speaks out when anyone is treated unjustly on the unit.

Good N:  Threatens to leave a piss-poor work environment that threatens the lives and livelihoods of patients and staff.
Good P:  Leads change for the transformation of workflow and clinical and managerial practices that impact the ability to work safely and sanely, is familiar with all possible nursing interventions and shines the light of professional truth for the removal of destructive staff and managers.

Soooo, I guess I’ll go back and change my opening thoughts.

…..give me a good person any day! See also this article about Online LPN programs.